FOOD FRAUD: ‘The New Food Agenda’, The True Cost of Rockefeller Agriculture – By Ryan Matters — RIELPOLITIK

Source – off-guardian.org “…The adverse health effects caused by the introduction of GMO crops into modern farming and the subsequent lack of safety testing cannot be overstated…as is evident, the transhumanists seek to alter our perception of food from something that is grown naturally in the earth beneath our feet to something that is synthetically […]

FOOD FRAUD: ‘The New Food Agenda’, The True Cost of Rockefeller Agriculture – By Ryan Matters — RIELPOLITIK

When’s the Anger stage?

Or did we already move right into acceptance, bypassing anger totally?

If anyone is still doubting how serious it really is—this global coup-d’etat happening right now, right under our noses—then this is the video for you!

How the World Economic Forum Is Getting The ’Great Reset’ Done
https://odysee.com/@neverlosetruth:0/wef:e

Evolution or Devolution?

According to Charles Darwin, intelligence is based on how efficient a species becomes at doing the things they need to survive.

Seems to me, based on this definition, the more dependent man is, the more intelligent he becomes.

Things man needs to survive: Food, water, shelter, health, reproduction

Food: Walmart
Water: Water company
Shelter: Construction industry
Health: Medical industry
Reproduction: Medical industry

Is efficiency working out well for us so far?

The 12 Commandments of Health

Quoted from the book Old Age Deferred by Arnold Lorand, M.D., 3rd edition, 1912 Carlsbad, Austria

He is considered to be a pioneer of modern geriatric medicine.

“Most of the evils that befall us in this world, including premature old age and early death, are, in our opinion, as we have often repeated, solely due to our own negligence; and to avoid such a fate we recommend the following precepts:

1.  To be as much as possible in the open air, and especially in the sunshine; and to take plenty of exercise, taking special care to breathe deeply and regularly.
2.  To live on a diet consisting of: meat once a day, eggs, cereals, green vegetables, fruit, and raw milk of healthy cows (as much as the stomach will permit); and to masticate properly.
3.  To take a bath daily; and in addition, once a week or once every two weeks, to take a sweat bath (if the heart can stand it).
4.  To have a daily action of the bowels; and in addition to take a purgative once a week if there is any tendency to constipation.
5.  To wear very porous underwear, preferably cotton; porous clothing, loose collars, light hat (if any), and low shoes.
6.  To go to be early, and to rise early.
7.  To sleep in a very dark and very quiet room, and with a window open; and not to sleep less than six to six and one-half hours, or more than seven and one-half, and for women eight and one-half hours.
8.  To have one complete day’s rest in each week, without even reading or writing.
9.  To avoid mental emotions, and also worries about things that have happened and cannot be altered, as well as about things that may happen.  Never to say unpleasant things, and to avoid listening to such, if possible.
10. To get married; and if a widow or widower, to marry again, and to avoid sexual activity beyond the physiological limit, as also to avoid a total suppression of the functions of these organs.
11. To be temperate in the use of alcohol and tobacco, and also in the use of coffee or tea.
12. To avoid places that are overheated, especially by steam, and badly ventilated.  To replace or reinforce the functions of the organs which may have become changed by age or disease, by means of the extracts from the corresponding organs of healthy animals; but only to do this under the strict supervision of medical men who are thoroughly familiar with the functions of the ductless glands.”

This doctor’s Wikipedia page directly contradicts what I have just taken from his book—not simply distorting his assertions, or cherry-picking quotes—by saying that this doctor promoted a vegetarian diet.

Arnold Lorand – Wikipedia

Joy & Pain

Sous le pont Mirabeau coule la Seine.
Et nos amours, faut-il qu’il m’en souvienne?
La joie venait toujours après la peine.

Under the Mirabeau bridge flows the Seine
And our loves, must I remember them?
The joy forever coming after pain’s den.

Excerpt from Le Pont Mirabeau by Guillaume Apollinaire, and my rather liberal translation 🙂

Fourteen years ago I impulse-purchased a black lab puppy from a stranger at a bar in Galveston, Texas. A few months later we were forced to evacuate before Hurricane Ike made landfall. Papi the puppy, and I, road tripped up to Arkansas, on through the Bluegrass Mountains, to my cousin’s lake cottage in Massachusetts for several weeks before renting a cottage on Cape Cod for several months. It was quite the adventure for us both.

Little did I know many more ‘adventures’ would follow. They include, but are not limited to: 5 emergency trips to the vet for: suspected rat poisoning, several snake bites, at least one stroke, severe constipation of unknown origin.

Additional drama created from: swallowing a fishing line, a wasp attack, snorting fire ants, 2 ear hematoma, (suspected) tripping on hallucinogens, fight with pit bull, jumping out of moving car, several spring disappearances including the last one where I discovered him half a mile away after several days tramping around with a pack of feral dogs—he was suffering from multiple head injuries, limping very badly and hardly recognized me.

Aahh, such is love. Of the trauma-bond variety especially.

Over the last couple of years he’d gone blind and deaf, had warts and tumors all over his body, but still had a voracious appetite and remained as vocal as ever, whether directed at the mail lady, strangers, or walks and mealtimes not occurring promptly enough for his preference.

He was, by far, the most demanding dog we’ve had—our ‘problem child’ we always joked—but we blubbered like babies when he passed a few days ago.

We will miss him dearly. He was a pill, no doubt, but he was our pill and our first pup, and for every ounce of pain he brought, they were balanced by joy.

Dancing together was one of those big joys. Dancing was a way to keep my spirits up on all those lonely weeks Hubby was working. Papi got pretty good at it. Of course it was always an issue who would lead.

This was one of our favorites. Tu vuo fa l’Americano

A life fully lived is one of joy and pain dancing through each season again and again.

Rest In Peace, dear Papi, thank you for sharing your life dance with us.

My Joan of Arc

Everybody needs a hero, Christine Massey is now mine. In a world where criminals and conmen, actors, malingerers, politicians and mindless yes-men are elevated to preposterous heights, it is a blessing to find such a gem of a woman.

A hero reminds you, without a single word to you directly, where there are gaps in your character you might still grow into, or incongruence in your worldview that’s worth exploring, or good people with wisdom to share and courage to inspire, or simply individuals truly worthy of your admiration.

They are a true blessing and often arrive just in time.

Funny Friday

Hoping to inspire a chuckle, or two. 🙂

“What a show! But alas, only a show!” Dr. Faustus, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1808)

And last, but not least, Hubby in his old man droopy drawers (sorry Lovey, couldn’t resist!) and Bubba, who sees a place to plop wherever he goes.

Not a dog house, but he hops right in anyway!

Hope y’all can channel your inner Bubba this weekend! 🙂

%d bloggers like this: