True Sustainability

As the United Nations, Club of Rome, World Health Organization and various other international ‘public-private’ partnerships try to propagandize the world into their vision of “Global Sustainability” there are a number of crucial variables they’ve left out, which localities could capitalize on, if they were made aware of this potential.

For example, did you know there are salt mines all over place in this country? Salt was the basis of our first ‘trade markets’ — long before exotic spices of the Orient — salt was King of the World.

Salt was, well, worth its weight in gold, as the saying goes. Why do we import tea, the ‘native Americans’ might have queried of the mostly British expats settling here? There’s perfectly good tea all around you, can’t you see? And they might have made a few good jokes about that.

But salt? You’re going to import salt, too? What the bleep for?! That’s not even joke-worthy, that’s just a dumb-ass death sentence! You know it’s everywhere around here, right? And the gold y’all so covet, what’s that for, exactly? Y’all are really so very attached to your adornments, eh? Good choices there, give over your salt, so you starve, for gold, so you can pay your taxes. Brilliant system!

Here on the wee homestead we came inspired to see how long and far a road it is to self and community sustainability. We were thinking like most homesteaders, survivalists, etc., are thinking—food, water, energy. Obvious, these are crucial.

But what about the salt? That, along with the water, was the very first thing either robbed, buried, or tainted by the industrialist-minded settlers. Not the ones who came for a better life more aligned with their God and purpose, the ones who came expressly to profiteer for the pay-masters back home.

Long before our water and air were compromised, our people enslaved to the State and our ranges overrun with slave labor, our salt was “buried” by the Global Regulators. There are salt mines and primal (renewable, sub-surface geysers, essentially) water available all over this country.

That was known centuries ago! But go ahead and demonstrate your loyalty to the State, that tricked and enslaved your Great, Great Grandparents and before, by wearing that muzzle of submission and voting for your next tyrant.

Don’t care where your salt comes from? Next you don’t care where your water comes from, or your food comes from, or your energy, or anything else.

Line up, bend over, take your shot.

https://www.onlyinyourstate.com/texas/salt-mine-tx/

Do You Kombucha-cha?

I realize it’s already a thing, considering it’s now a $600 million annual industry, but I thought I didn’t like it.  I couldn’t have been more wrong, I’m happy to say.  I haven’t been this excited about a new thing (for me!) since I started making cheese.

In fact, it’s not at all new, just popularized and mass marketed these days.  Kombucha has an ancient and fascinating history and far more uses than just a really healthy and delicious beverage.  I’m just learning about them all, but I’m keen to incorporate this little miracle into our homestead lifestyle.

Sally Fallon, my favorite cookbook author, believes as I do that, “the craving for both alcohol and soft drinks stems from an ancient collective memory of the kind of lacto-fermented beverages still found in traditional societies.”

And it’s so much more than just a wonderful beverage.

Kombucha’s numerous applications make it a natural component of ‘closed-loop’ systems, in which its waste products can be converted into toxin-free commodities.  Whether as compost or foodstuff, there is some way to turn every by-product of the kombucha brewing process into something useful. The Big Book of Kombucha by Hannah Crum & Alex LaGory

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If you’ve only tried commercial Kombucha you might be like I was and think you don’t like it either.  My home-brewed version taste nothing like the store-bought brands I tried.  And, the first time I tried home-brewing I was doing it all wrong.  I’m so grateful to a friend who gave me another SCOBY and insisted I try it again.  Following the tips and tricks from several great resources, I’m hooked.

A SCOBY (Symbiotic Culture Of Bacteria and Yeast) is kind of like a sourdough starter, shared among friends and self-replicating.

There’s far more information available than the first time I tried home-brewing many years ago.  The key to my new love is the 2nd fermentation bottling with flavors, when the tea becomes carbonated.  Even if you’re not a tea-lover you might be surprised, I think it tastes more like a mild, flavored soda.  Some Kombucha lovers have claimed it helped them kick their cola habit and replace it with something far healthier in every way—for the body, the paycheck, and the environment.

Besides the excellent book mentioned above, these sites are also great resources to help you get started, learn more, or stay addicted.

Cultured Food Life

Cultural Revivalists