More Foraged Favorites

Our dear Tori is a master forager.  She’ll steal unreservedly from the melon and berry patches to the fig and mulberry trees, to even the unripe cucumbers and squashes.

Equally in the forest she is clearly divinely inspired–the perfectly ripe passion fruit she’ll scout, the bones get unearthed as her possessions no matter who has buried them, and she leads me to all the best bramble patches.  The forest and our garden are her perpetual oysters–and while to see my melons walk away makes me want to cry, to her happy prance with edible treasure, well there is only to laugh!

And, apparently she’s not the only astute forager.

I love seeing how many foraging sites and blogs are currently flourishing.  They inspire me to add on and spread the wealth.

Indian Strawberry

indianstrawberries

We have a big patch of these amiable volunteers just adjacent to the asparagus patch, natural companions, perhaps?  In Scandinavia I met gardeners who insisted on planting their strawberries and asparagus and dill in the same space. I  While these taste pretty bland compared to our cultivated varieties, they are still quite pretty, which is enough for me to spend the time to gather and prepare them.

I toss them in a salad with mulberries coming ripe at the same time. Or use them as a garnish with a spring weed pesto, along with the leaves, in moderation.  Here’s a variation using chickweed, but it’s fun to get creative with whatever is in abundance.

https://nittygrittylife.com/eat-weeds-wild-weed-pesto/

 

Honeysuckle

honeysuckle1

While it is an invasive species for us in the southern U.S., at least it’s a useful one!  While I’ve only made tea with it, some are patient enough to make jam.  Maybe this will be the year I give that a try.

It’s also prized in traditional Chinese medicine.
(From: Dr. Mercola https://articles.mercola.com/herbs-spices/honeysuckle.aspx)

In TCM, the honeysuckle flower is commonly used to help ease the flu, colds and sore throat. According to Science Alert,11 this plant has the ability to prevent the influenza virus from replicating. An animal study published in the journal Cell Research supports this, as it found that honeysuckle, when combined with a plant microRNA called MIR2911, was able to suppress swine flu and bird flu viruses effectively.12
Xiao Er Ke Chuan Ling Oral Liquid (KCL), an herbal preparation that uses honeysuckle and nine other plants, was found to help treat acute bronchitis in children. A study in the Chinese Journal of Integrated Traditional and Western Medicine said KCL has antiviral, antibacterial and potent pharmacological actions.13
Honeysuckle was also found to have wound-healing properties in rat models, according to the BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine journal.

Sassafras

A quite undermined tree of the South, considering its illustrious origins and conspiratorial fate.  It is a tree widely cultivated in Asia-Pacific as an essential ingredient to the popular drug, or versions of it anyway, generally called “ecstasy”.

At first, like cannabis, it was classified among the most harmful of substances by the FDA, though our ancestors had previously been very acquainted and attached to these and so many other suddenly ‘dangerous’ plants. Then while they were deemed “carcinogenic” by our government, simultaneously expanding was its cultivation in foreign countries.  This was actually before “Poppy Bush” but perhaps setting that very precedent for the former president?!

While I’ve no idea how to make the popular street drug, I can assure you it makes a deliciously fragrant tea, traditional root beer, and gumbo filé powder.

Mullein

mullein

One of the few things growing strong all winter in the South is one of the classic remedies of the typical seasonable winter ails–upper respiratory infections,  cough, sinus, and so on. Go figure, mother nature to the rescue.

Yaupon

yaupon

As a tea it rivals the Lipton or Lausanne you are paying good money for, it really does.  It does contain caffeine and was used among the native populations regularly and as an alternative to coffee in hard times among new settlers.  Drying it for a just a couple of days before roasting makes the process quicker, but roasting isn’t necessary if you like a more mild ‘green tea’ taste.  The beauty is, it’s prolific and harvestable all-year-round for humans, and for the bees they have a reliable early forage in spring.  Just don’t eat the berries!

Spring weed pesto and/or chimichurra sauce

Of course we love our traditional basil-based pesto with pine nuts, such a classic.  But, whatever’s available in our time/space, we use it!  Walnuts or pecans can replace the pricey pine version, or skip the nuts altogether.  I often leave out the parmesan too (my own homemade of course), and either add that last minute, if appropriate, or make more of a  chimichurri-style sauce, so yum!

We both love a combination of wild and cultivated plants and I let them blend altogether in the garden and in the sauce.  Chervil, parsley, cilantro, or maybe arugula generously and gorgeously partnered with wild violet, chickweed, wild rose petal, or whatever is out there! Once prepared it’s a delicious condiment for meats, a base for dressing and marinade, or a sauce, stand-alone or blended, an instant topping for eggs or toast.  It freezes really well too.

https://draxe.com/recipe/chimichurri-recipe/

Let your local, seasonal nature be your greatest guide. 🙂

A few favorite resources:

Idiot’s Guides Foraging by Mark Merriwether Vorderbruggen, PhD
http://www.foragingtexas.com

https://www.growforagecookferment.com/forage

https://sustainabledish.com

Nature’s Garden: A Guide to Identifying, Harvesting and Preparing Edible Wild Plants by Samuel Thayer

 

 

 

Edible and Medicinal Wild Plants of Spring

Magnificent post! I had just been planning to do one similar, not only does Mark spare me, he out-performs by far!

Mark All My Words

by Mark Miles

I’ve been fascinated with plants since I was a child. From my earliest memories, I can recall exploring in the woods, traipsing through undergrowth, building forts with sticks and twigs, admiring wildflowers, and feeling a profound sense of peace and tranquility in the presence of plants. They’ve always been a part of my life to one degree or another, and as I’ve gotten older I’ve come to appreciate their role not only in my own life but in human society in general.

One aspect of my appreciation has increased recently, and that is the health benefits of plants. I’ve discussed in a prior article (which you can read here) how I’ve dealt with prediabetes, obesity, and progressive cognitive decline after a period of poor diet in my twenties. Recently I’ve been beset with health issues relating to nascent food allergies, circulatory inflammation, and perforation of the…

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Collective Utopia vs. Private Idaho

I lost my last hive just a few weeks ago, mysteriously.  They dutifully pollinated the pears before their departure, sweet little creatures they are.  Unfortunately, they didn’t leave a note, or much clue.  I hope they swarmed and found a suitable new happy home, but I believe from what little evidence remained, that this was not the case.

The drama of the bees has been droning on now for decades.  But of course, have no fear, technology comes to the rescue!  First create the problem, then try to fix it while creating 3 new problems–that’s the modern, strategic, scientifically-advanced model at work.

Problem with disappearing bees?  Solution, robot bees!

http://www.businessinsider.com/walmart-robot-bees-farming-patent-2018-3

The next big thing according to TV’s famed Dr. Oz, is the RFID chip.  Keep losing your Alzheimer parent? Get ’em the chip!

Steve Hoffman gushes over the new tech which will allow our minds to merge with one another.  He calls it ‘almost like heaven’—a state of all-inclusiveness with others where our individuality is traded and usurped by the collective, to the extreme degree we can actually feel another’s pain as our own.

But, only if we choose it, of course.  Right.  That’s good, because mark my words, I don’t want to be in his mind, and I certainly don’t want him, or anyone, invading mine at will either.

 

Will we get to choose?  I’m pretty doubtful on that point.  Right now, do I get to choose whether my region is cloud-seeded, or not?  Nope. https://weathermodificationhistory.com/

Do I get to choose whether Walmart creates robot bees? Nope.

Do I get to choose whether scientists experiment with technology meant to replace nature, meant to manipulate the environment beyond measure, meant to research consciousness with the intention of controlling it, even replacing it? Nope, nope and nope.

Dr. Andreagiovanni Reina, Research Associate in Collective Robotics in the University of Sheffield’s Department of Computer Science, said: “This study is exciting because it suggests that honey bee colonies adhere to the same laws as the brain when making collective decisions.

“The study also supports the view of bee colonies as being similar to complete organisms or better still, superorganisms, composed of a large number of fully developed and autonomous individuals that interact with each other to bring forth a collective response.

“With this view in mind, parallels between bees in a colony and neurons in a brain can be traced, helping us to understand and identify the general mechanisms underlying psychophysics laws, which may ultimately lead to a better understanding of the human brain. Finding similarities between the behavior of honey bee colonies and brain neurons is useful because the behavior of bees selecting a nest is simpler than studying neurons in a brain that makes decisions.”

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-018-22616-y

Is it for a love of nature and mankind that science and technology seek to study it so thoroughly and in this particular direction?  Or, is it with the intention of replacing nature and mankind for the benefit of god knows whom?

Do they ever ask themselves if we all have the same vision of a collective utopia?

As they preach for the essential Oneness of humanity, the love and light of unity, the exalted state of community, the Kumbaya collusion of the hive, the higher consciousness of the collective, do they consider as well the famed quote by a character in one of Jean Paul Sartre’s most read plays, “L’enfer, c’est les autres.” (“Hell, it’s other people.”)

As they profess their profound compassion and concern, do they care that some of us don’t care to live with robotized nature?  Have they considered putting their intellectual efforts toward saving nature, co-creating with nature, relating equally to it, rather than commanding it, deconstructing it, subjugating it, destroying and replacing it?

Do they tread so shallowly in their own individuality that they cannot conceive of the notion that one’s relationship to oneself and to nature is by far greater, more fundamental and essential, than one’s relationship to any other?

Keep your robots, your synthetics, your hive mind, your Internet of Things, your technological collective Utopia, I don’t want it.

Many of us don’t want it, but we seem to have no choice in the matter.

If I weren’t an optimist, I’d feel we are doomed here on the wee homestead; doomed to watch as we are driven from the heaven of creating our own private Idaho into the hell of another’s version of ‘progress.’

My idea of progress:

Companion planting 3.0 (gardening by aesthetics) — cultivars co-existing with native volunteers (yes, I mean weeds); edibles among poisons; annuals with perennials with crops, seasonal ‘layering’.  More on all that coming soon!

Handy Hubby’s idea of progress:
Spending his entire vacation building!  Color me impressed. 🙂

 

 

 

Fake news and the programmed viewer

As I am lagging in recent posts, I happily and gratefully reblog one of my favorite men of reason. 🙂

“Well, the voice must be right, because we’re seeing the pictures. If the voice said the riots were due to garbage-pickup cancellations, the viewer would believe that, too.

We see Building #7 of the WTC collapse. Must have been the result of a fire. The anchor tells us so. Words give meaning to pictures.

Staged news.”

Jon Rappoport's Blog

Fake news and the programmed viewer

by Jon Rappoport

April 5, 2018

Every television newscast: staged reality.

The news is all about manipulating the context of stories. The thinner the context, the thinner the mind must become to accept it.

If you want to visualize this, imagine a rectangular solid. The news covers the top surface. Therefore, the viewer’s mind is trained to work in only two dimensions. Then it can’t fathom depth, and it certainly can’t appreciate the fact that the whole rectangular solid moves through time, the fourth dimension.

Focus on the network evening news. This is where the staging is done well—until recently.

First, we have the studio image itself, the colors in foreground and background, the blend of restful and charged hues. The anchor and his/her smooth style.

Then we have the shifting of venue from the studio to reporters in the field, demonstrating the reach…

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The next huge GMO crime is here

If the processes were safe, they wouldn’t need all the double-speak.

“Therefore the GMO industry is telling the public and regulators that genome-edited plants are indistinguishable from naturally bred plants, and yet at the same time it is telling patent offices that genome-edited plants are completely different from naturally bred plants.”

Jon Rappoport's Blog

The next huge GMO crime is here

by Jon Rappoport

April 2, 2018

It’s “genome-editing” of food crops.

The official propaganda could go several ways. One version: “We won’t be inserting foreign genes from other species into food plants anymore, as we do now in GMO crops. Instead, we’ll be tweaking and editing the genes that are already in the plants. It’s wonderful.”

Of course, this “new and improved process” can produce unintended and unpredictable effects that ripple through plant DNA. Oops.

Here is a cautionary statement from Jennifer Doudna, the co-discoverer of the latest and greatest method of gene-surgery, called CRISPR: “I guess I worry about a couple of things. I think there’s sort of the potential for unintended consequences of gene editing in people for clinical use. How would you ever do the kinds of experiments that you might want to do to ensure safety?”

The same worries…

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5G: Harmful effects of a new technology

“Long buried by Germany’s government, a report offering a rare window on 878 Russian-language science papers (1960-1997) was finally translated, with updates, into English. Long-term studies on Soviet workers repeatedly charted chronic debilitation from weak EMFs – including pulsed microwaves that have been commercially ‘repackaged’ for today’s telecoms.”

https://theecologist.org/2017/jan/12/krakows-bold-step-curb-electromagnetic-pollution-reflects-growing-evidence-harm

Jon Rappoport's Blog

by Jon Rappoport

March 26, 2018

* See “5G Radiation Dangers—11 Reasons To Be Concerned,” by Lloyd Burrell (twitter), at electricsense.com. Well worth a read.

* Of course, read Patrick Wood’s (twitter) instant classic, Technocracy Rising, which explains the hidden agenda of Globalism in the 21st century. Patrick’s blog is here.

“Along with the 5G there is another thing coming — Internet of Things. If you look at it…the radiation level is going to increase tremendously and yet the industry is very excited about it… they project 5G/IoT business to be a $7 trillion business.” — Prof. Girish Kumar, Professor at Electrical Engineering Department at IIT Bombay

5G, the latest and greatest method of faster wireless transmission, is coming on with a storm.

Governments are promoting it as if the future of humanity depends on it. It MUST BE implemented.

When governments and…

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Getting Real (part 2)

Handy Hubby says my first attempt to burst your bubble was too long and dry to have the desired effect. I agree, bless his heart, so here I try anew.

Again, as in part 1, I quote from The Paradox of Progress, available online to anyone thanks to the efforts of the National Intelligence Council and intended to inform the incoming U.S. President, among others of course.

From page 197:

Global governance of common-pool resources such as public health, water, food and other key resources will inevitably challenge current ideas of privacy, control and power.”

Let’s just consider that one sentence for this post—how’s that for short and sweet, my dear?

bathday
Big ideas in small packages

 

The entire notion of global governance was considered the territory of conspiracy theorists until quite recently, except by only those few most in-the-know, meaning the powers-that-shouldn’t-be, who’ve had that agenda, and been planning and discussing that agenda, even openly, since WWII, at least.

robbers
“I wonder how much I can steal before they shoot me?”

Now we hear within the next decade the precious moment will have arrived, according to those paid to know and plan such ‘challenges.’

 

lineup
Old farmer’s adage: Control the food, control the water, control the animal.

Centralized control of the world’s resources, held in the hands of an un-elected yet ‘official’ government to which all nations and people will surrender their current ideas of privacy and power. How does that sound to you?

papipower
Love it, or else.

 

One ultra-huge government to control all the other governments of the world.

How do you find it now trying to get Washington, DC to act in your interest?

Do you already feel powerless in trying to get those GMOs labeled? Or in getting your voice heard on weather manipulation and climate engineering? Or in understanding how constant wars around the world are an advantage to the average citizen? Or in holding criminals in government accountable?

on duty
“How many times must I repeat myself? The fox is guarding the hen house.”

 

Or in finally and once in for all putting an end the recurring waves of pedophiles and sex traffickers in powerful positions, or in constant financial corruption, or in the dismal protection of property rights and stewardship of our environment?

birdsofafeather
Birds of a feather flock together!

 

If you don’t feel powerless against the establishment already, it’s because you haven’t yet tried to go up against it, even in the most remote fashion.

lillambs
That sounds like a big job for a lil’ lamb.

 

If you do already feel powerless, now imagine that powerlessness exponentially worse as the strings of the control system move permanently away from the vestiges of what’s left of the public’s meddling grasps at authentic law and order, by those precious few still futilely working to replace the current state of perpetual posturing.

notme
“That’s not my trash.” “Me either, I didn’t do it!”

 

Should you find yourself curious or concerned about the global government being planned for us you may choose to do some online research. If so, and if this is new to you, you will most certainly fall over the first stumbling block very quickly. That is, all the morons screaming, “It’s the Jews!”

jews

To appease for these loudmouths, shills and disinfo agents you might feel tempted to call your favorite Jewish friend or neighbor and assure them you don’t think it’s the Jews. It might make you both feel better about the whole thing in advance.

And then get down to some serious research.

dontfencemein
‘”Don’t fence us in!”

 

Before you get tempted to point any fingers at all, at any group, for any reason, remember that groups are made up first of individuals.  Maybe that Jewish friend might even like the idea of a world government, some do. That’s fine.

So then let’s get some good, open, very public debates going about it on the national media. Because, we are a free country still, right? We have a functioning, unbiased media informing the public of those things that should most concern us, right?

That is the illusion we are currently and have been being sold for many decades now. Yet here is the National Intelligence Council telling us to expect world government within the next decade while the average American citizen still thinks this is a conspiracy theory thanks to our media.

prisonplanet
“Hey, who put that black wall there?”

 

When you start your research, you may want look at what’s happening right now, in cities like Santa Rosa and New Orleans. These are considered to be the great models of Disaster Capitalism. All coming soon to a city near you.

Global governance of common-pool resources such as public health, water, food and other key resources will inevitably challenge current ideas of privacy, control and power.”

It is intended to envelop every nook and cranny of the countryside too, with the Internet of Things and the 5G grid. They sell us the benefits and conveniences, but always leave undisclosed the potential and even imminent dangers.

Will you lounge passively as the string-pullers draw up our last vestiges of power and autonomy, sovereignty and local and self-reliance?

happypig1

My personal opinion is Jesus will not save you, or anyone else. But, unfortunately that’s bound to be your next stumbling block.

Of course, the National Intelligence Council could be wrong. 

Or, global government could be marvelous.  But, as for us on the wee homestead, on that remote chance we’re just not willing to bet our bacon.

bigchopsmoker