Fake news and the programmed viewer

As I am lagging in recent posts, I happily and gratefully reblog one of my favorite men of reason. 🙂

“Well, the voice must be right, because we’re seeing the pictures. If the voice said the riots were due to garbage-pickup cancellations, the viewer would believe that, too.

We see Building #7 of the WTC collapse. Must have been the result of a fire. The anchor tells us so. Words give meaning to pictures.

Staged news.”

Jon Rappoport's Blog

Fake news and the programmed viewer

by Jon Rappoport

April 5, 2018

Every television newscast: staged reality.

The news is all about manipulating the context of stories. The thinner the context, the thinner the mind must become to accept it.

If you want to visualize this, imagine a rectangular solid. The news covers the top surface. Therefore, the viewer’s mind is trained to work in only two dimensions. Then it can’t fathom depth, and it certainly can’t appreciate the fact that the whole rectangular solid moves through time, the fourth dimension.

Focus on the network evening news. This is where the staging is done well—until recently.

First, we have the studio image itself, the colors in foreground and background, the blend of restful and charged hues. The anchor and his/her smooth style.

Then we have the shifting of venue from the studio to reporters in the field, demonstrating the reach…

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The next huge GMO crime is here

If the processes were safe, they wouldn’t need all the double-speak.

“Therefore the GMO industry is telling the public and regulators that genome-edited plants are indistinguishable from naturally bred plants, and yet at the same time it is telling patent offices that genome-edited plants are completely different from naturally bred plants.”

Jon Rappoport's Blog

The next huge GMO crime is here

by Jon Rappoport

April 2, 2018

It’s “genome-editing” of food crops.

The official propaganda could go several ways. One version: “We won’t be inserting foreign genes from other species into food plants anymore, as we do now in GMO crops. Instead, we’ll be tweaking and editing the genes that are already in the plants. It’s wonderful.”

Of course, this “new and improved process” can produce unintended and unpredictable effects that ripple through plant DNA. Oops.

Here is a cautionary statement from Jennifer Doudna, the co-discoverer of the latest and greatest method of gene-surgery, called CRISPR: “I guess I worry about a couple of things. I think there’s sort of the potential for unintended consequences of gene editing in people for clinical use. How would you ever do the kinds of experiments that you might want to do to ensure safety?”

The same worries…

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5G: Harmful effects of a new technology

“Long buried by Germany’s government, a report offering a rare window on 878 Russian-language science papers (1960-1997) was finally translated, with updates, into English. Long-term studies on Soviet workers repeatedly charted chronic debilitation from weak EMFs – including pulsed microwaves that have been commercially ‘repackaged’ for today’s telecoms.”

https://theecologist.org/2017/jan/12/krakows-bold-step-curb-electromagnetic-pollution-reflects-growing-evidence-harm

Jon Rappoport's Blog

by Jon Rappoport

March 26, 2018

* See “5G Radiation Dangers—11 Reasons To Be Concerned,” by Lloyd Burrell (twitter), at electricsense.com. Well worth a read.

* Of course, read Patrick Wood’s (twitter) instant classic, Technocracy Rising, which explains the hidden agenda of Globalism in the 21st century. Patrick’s blog is here.

“Along with the 5G there is another thing coming — Internet of Things. If you look at it…the radiation level is going to increase tremendously and yet the industry is very excited about it… they project 5G/IoT business to be a $7 trillion business.” — Prof. Girish Kumar, Professor at Electrical Engineering Department at IIT Bombay

5G, the latest and greatest method of faster wireless transmission, is coming on with a storm.

Governments are promoting it as if the future of humanity depends on it. It MUST BE implemented.

When governments and…

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Getting Real (part 2)

Handy Hubby says my first attempt to burst your bubble was too long and dry to have the desired effect. I agree, bless his heart, so here I try anew.

Again, as in part 1, I quote from The Paradox of Progress, available online to anyone thanks to the efforts of the National Intelligence Council and intended to inform the incoming U.S. President, among others of course.

From page 197:

“Global governance of common-pool resources such as public health, water, food and other key resources will inevitably challenge current ideas of privacy, control and power.”

Let’s just consider that one sentence for this post—how’s that for short and sweet, my dear?

bathday
Big ideas in small packages

 

The entire notion of global governance was considered the territory of conspiracy theorists until quite recently, except by only those few most in-the-know, meaning the powers-that-shouldn’t-be, who’ve had that agenda, and been planning and discussing that agenda, even openly, since WWII, at least.

robbers
“I wonder how much I can steal before they shoot me?”

Now we hear within the next decade the precious moment will have arrived, according to those paid to know and plan such ‘challenges.’

 

lineup
Old farmer’s adage: Control the food, control the water, control the animal.

Centralized control of the world’s resources, held in the hands of an un-elected yet ‘official’ government to which all nations and people will surrender their current ideas of privacy and power. How does that sound to you?

papipower
Love it, or else.

 

One ultra-huge government to control all the other governments of the world.

How do you find it now trying to get Washington, DC to act in your interest?

Do you already feel powerless in trying to get those GMOs labeled? Or in getting your voice heard on weather manipulation and climate engineering? Or in understanding how constant wars around the world are an advantage to the average citizen? Or in holding criminals in government accountable?

on duty
“How many times must I repeat myself? The fox is guarding the hen house.”

 

Or in finally and once in for all putting an end the recurring waves of pedophiles and sex traffickers in powerful positions, or in constant financial corruption, or in the dismal protection of property rights and stewardship of our environment?

birdsofafeather
Birds of a feather flock together!

 

If you don’t feel powerless against the establishment already, it’s because you haven’t yet tried to go up against it, even in the most remote fashion.

lillambs
That sounds like a big job for a lil’ lamb.

 

If you do already feel powerless, now imagine that powerlessness exponentially worse as the strings of the control system move permanently away from the vestiges of what’s left of the public’s meddling grasps at authentic law and order, by those precious few still futilely working to replace the current state of perpetual posturing.

notme
“That’s not my trash.” “Me either, I didn’t do it!”

 

Should you find yourself curious or concerned about the global government being planned for us you may choose to do some online research. If so, and if this is new to you, you will most certainly fall over the first stumbling block very quickly. That is, all the morons screaming, “It’s the Jews!”

jews

To appease for these loudmouths, shills and disinfo agents you might feel tempted to call your favorite Jewish friend or neighbor and assure them you don’t think it’s the Jews. It might make you both feel better about the whole thing in advance.

And then get down to some serious research.

dontfencemein
‘”Don’t fence us in!”

 

Before you get tempted to point any fingers at all, at any group, for any reason, remember that groups are made up first of individuals.  Maybe that Jewish friend might even like the idea of a world government, some do. That’s fine.

So then let’s get some good, open, very public debates going about it on the national media. Because, we are a free country still, right? We have a functioning, unbiased media informing the public of those things that should most concern us, right?

That is the illusion we are currently and have been being sold for many decades now. Yet here is the National Intelligence Council telling us to expect world government within the next decade while the average American citizen still thinks this is a conspiracy theory thanks to our media.

prisonplanet
“Hey, who put that black wall there?”

 

When you start your research, you may want look at what’s happening right now, in cities like Santa Rosa and New Orleans. These are considered to be the great models of Disaster Capitalism. All coming soon to a city near you.

“Global governance of common-pool resources such as public health, water, food and other key resources will inevitably challenge current ideas of privacy, control and power.”

It is intended to envelop every nook and cranny of the countryside too, with the Internet of Things and the 5G grid. They sell us the benefits and conveniences, but always leave undisclosed the potential and even imminent dangers.

Will you lounge passively as the string-pullers draw up our last vestiges of power and autonomy, sovereignty and local and self-reliance?

happypig1

My personal opinion is Jesus will not save you, or anyone else. But, unfortunately that’s bound to be your next stumbling block.

Of course, the National Intelligence Council could be wrong. 

Or, global government could be marvelous.  But, as for us on the wee homestead, on that remote chance we’re just not willing to bet our bacon.

bigchopsmoker

 

 

Why does modern medicine have a big problem with natural health?

“The scale is tipping in the direction of natural health–herbs, nutritional supplements, proper food, exercise, clean water, “alternative” practitioners.

Medical propaganda is on a long decline of failure.

That problem is very worrying to the medical cartel.”

Jon Rappoport's Blog

Why does modern medicine have a big problem with natural health?

by Jon Rappoport

March 12, 2018

Well, there is the money, of course.

When millions of people forego expensive and toxic medical drugs; when they rarely see conventional doctors; when they don’t receive vaccinations and don’t have their children vaccinated; when they opt for natural remedies; when, worst of all, THEY STAY HEALTHY, this is a hammer blow to drug-based medicine.

These “natural health” people are also going against The Plan, which is a cradle-to-grave system, whereby humans are diagnosed with 30 or 40 diseases and disorders during their lifetime—requiring large amounts of toxic and debilitating drugs—and then they die. Note: The effects of the drugs are labeled “diseases,” which in turn are treated with more harmful drugs, resulting in new diagnoses of “diseases,” and so on. It’s a self-feeding, self-replicating parade of destruction.

You can see the final…

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Getting Real

I’m going to spend the next few posts trying to burst your bubble.   I don’t do this to be mean or bossy, I just think it’s about time.  By “you”  I mean all those who are living in a fantasy-based reality at still this late hour. 

Call me one more canary in the coal mine, or even a nervous Nelly who cries, “The sky is falling!”  But seriously, the sky is falling. 

I’m concerned that if you don’t see it now, and start preparing, it will be too late.  You see, I believe the sky is falling, because that’s what the string-pullers are telling us, quite directly and in plain sight. 

Maybe you don’t know who I mean by ‘string-pullers’?  That doesn’t matter now anyway.  What’s crucial is you read and learn from the same materials as our U.S. president, his staff, a good number of smart executives, the majority of the world’s intelligence agents and a select number of savvy entrepreneurs. 

If you really want to know where in the world we are headed, don’t think your favorite news anchor will be telling you on TV. 

The Paradox of Progress is the latest work of the National Intelligence Council.  From wiki:

“One of the NICs most important analytical projects is a Global Trends report produced for the incoming US president. The report is delivered to the incoming president between Election Day and Inauguration Day, and it assesses critical drivers and scenarios for global trends with an approximate time horizon of fifteen years. The Global Trends analysis provides a basis for long-range strategic policy assessment for the White House and the intelligence community. The NIC’s most recent Global Trends report, “Global Trends 2035: Paradox of Progress” was released in January 2017.[1]

These are the folks who know which strings are being pulled.  That’s their job.  I don’t think they just make this stuff up for fun; I think they are quite serious about their work, and a wise man or woman should know where that work is taking us.

From page 170:

“Natural and human-induced changes in many of Earth’s ecosystems during the coming decades are likely to weaken the planet’s resilience and expose humans to new health, food, water, energy, and infrastructure vulnerabilities and demands. With changes in climate, weather will become less predictable and suitable for the status quo. The oceans’ biodiversity will plummet as they become warmer and more acidic, fragile, and polluted. Human and animal health will face threats from heatwaves, cold snaps, and the altered dynamics of pathogen spread. These risks will be distributed unequally in time and geography but have the potential to harm most of the world’s populations and ecosystems—severely in some cases, and catastrophically in others.

Environmental and climate changes will challenge systems in different dimensions; heat waves, for example, stress infrastructure, energy, human and animal health, and agriculture. Climate change— observed or anticipated—almost certainly will become an increasingly integral component of how people view their world, especially as populations are projected to swell in those areas most vulnerable to extreme weather events and sea-level rise, including coastal megacities and regions already suffering from water scarcity. Many of the ecological and environmental stresses from climate change—and the infectious diseases it will affect—will cut across state borders, making coordination among governments and international institutions crucial to effective responses. Policies and programs to mitigate and adapt to these challenges will spur opportunities for those well-positioned to benefit.

Major Trends Changes in Earth Systems. Climate change, sea level rise, and ocean acidification are likely to amplify stresses already felt from population growth, urbanization, inadequate environmental protection, and the use of energy and past natural resources. Although new climate policies could reduce the rate of greenhouse gas emissions over time, past emissions already have locked in a significant rise in global mean temperature, which will in turn drive more frequent and intense extreme weather events, such as heatwaves, droughts, and floods. The steady run of record-setting weather and growing frequency of extreme events suggest to many scientists that climate change is hitting harder and sooner than the gradual change often projected. The intensity of the disruptions could vary widely, spawning unpleasant surprises, particularly given that an increasingly significant fraction of the planet’s species already are at increased extinction risk.

• Forecasting changes with greater regional and time precision becomes increasingly uncertain, but the stresses will probably disrupt the most vulnerable—or unlucky—populations in countries at all levels of development.

• Storm surges, augmented by sea level rise, are likely to threaten many coastal systems and lowlying areas, and this environmental volatility almost certainly will disrupt food production patterns and water availability, fueling broader economic, political and social stresses. Changes in the Arctic will exceed those felt in the middle latitudes, and reductions in summer sea-ice will make the Arctic more accessible than any time in human history.

Human and Animal Health Under Pressure. Changing environmental conditions and increasing global connectivity will affect precipitation patterns, biodiversity, and the geographic distribution of pathogens and their hosts, which will in turn affect the viability and vitality of crops and agricultural systems; the emergence, transmission, and spread of human and animal infectious diseases; and potential medical and pharmacological discoveries. The direct impact by environmental stressors to human health from increased heat stress, floods, drought, and increased frequency of intense storms will force difficult decisions on how and where to live, particularly in low-income countries in sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia.

• Indirect environmental threats to population health will emerge in the form of food insecurity, under-nutrition, and air and water quality declines as a result of pollution. Troubling trends in communicable diseases—in particular, emerging zoonotic diseases, antimicrobial resistant (AMR) pathogens—and noncommunicable diseases (NCDs)—including heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and mental illness—may be the result of these effects,

• These concerns will be further intensified by demographic and cultural trends, such as aging societies in Europe and Asia; inadequate nutrition and sanitation in Africa and India, urbanization and development in uninhabited areas and the rise of megacities; and a widening inequality gap. Perversely, increased longevity—an almost-universal goal—will reduce food and water security in places that are only marginally capable of supporting their populations.

Unaddressed disease-control deficiencies in national and global health systems will make outbreaks more difficult to detect and manage, increasing the potential for epidemics far beyond their points of origin. Increasing contact between people and the easier spread of diseases mean that chronic infectious diseases that are already widespread—such as tuberculosis, HIV/AIDS, and hepatitis—will continue to pose heavy economic and human burdens on high-prevalence countries, despite the significant international resources that have been committed to combatting them. Many middleincome countries already struggle with the burden of increasing noncommunicable diseases on top of persistent infectious diseases.

Critical Human Systems at Risk. The increasing incidence of extreme weather events put all people at risk, although those concentrated in dense areas will be especially vulnerable. International organizations will be increasingly stretched to respond to the food, water, transportation, shelter, and health needs of those affected unless states and localities have made provisions to mitigate the risks, such as infrastructure improvements and early warning systems.

• Soil and land degradation during the next 20 years will diminish land available for food production, contributing to shortages and raising prices. Even more-affluent nations are at risk, to the extent that they rely on the highly efficient global agricultural trade that has developed under stable environmental conditions during peacetime.

• Water shortages and pollution probably will undermine the economic performance and health conditions of populations worldwide, including those of major developing countries. Economic output would suffer if countries do not have enough clean water to generate electrical power or to support manufacturing and resource extraction. Water problems—added to poverty, social tension, environmental degradation, ineffectual leadership, gender inequality, and weak political institutions—contribute to social disruptions that can prompt state failures.

Key Choices How will political leaders and populations respond to a world less able to sustain life? Environmental and ecological degradation and climate change are likely to force governments and aid organizations at all levels to wrestle with how to divide their resources between crisis response—especially to the most vulnerable populations—and long-term investment to build more resilient and adaptive systems. Unprecedented weather events and ongoing desertification will hurt vulnerable populations in Africa, Asia, and the Middle East, with major droughts probably causing some water, food, and livestock systems to fail. More intense tropical storms will have a cumulative impact on infrastructure, health, and biodiversity in some coastal and low-lying areas that could overwhelm recovery and reconstruction efforts. Those struggling to survive such disruptions could, on the positive side, develop radical innovations for improvement or , more negatively, turn violent, migrate—if allowed by similarly struggling or less hospitable neighbors—or die.

• Some prominent voices will call for interventions involving climate geoengineering, although the governance and legal structures needed for these technologies to be deployed with minimal social disruption are almost certain to lag research and development.

• There are also likely to be calls to give the victims of extreme levels of environmental degradation some form of “asylum-like” right as refugees.

172

To what extent will individuals, governments, and private, civil, and international organizations employ new technologies to improve food, water, and energy security; air and ocean quality and biodiversity; human and animal health; and the resilience of transportation, information systems, and other critical infrastructure? The inability to predict the timing or location of complex environmental and climatological events increases the need to develop information systems that would better enable officials to make near realtime assessment and policy decisions to minimize damages and casualties. Prevention is better than cure; the cost of building resilient infrastructure is generally much lower than disaster recovery, but mobilizing the political will and resources to take preventative action will be difficult without a dramatic crisis to realign priorities.

Even after a crisis, the will to prevent future harm is often overwhelmed by the breadth and complexity of investing in climate and public health research, monitoring and surveillance; financing climate resilient health systems; developing a sustainable carbon budget; developing more energy-efficient buildings and transportation systems, applying “best practices” for industrial processes to reduce the risks to food, water, and health systems; improving water management through pricing allocations and “virtual water” trade; and investing in water-related sectors such as agriculture, power, and water treatment.

An increasingly important challenge for resource sustainability will be developing the capability to assess local population needs for power, fuel, and food in near real-time. Tracking the interactions between natural resources and people—and wildlife—would enable better understanding of resource needs, a key vulnerability in an era of increasingly scarce resources.

New investments in energy and technologies offer an important opportunity to reduce the risk of adverse climate change, although most of these will require substantial funding and years of effort to deliver benefits. These include clean-energy sources and enabling technologies, such as offshore wind energy, solar cells, distributed power generation, and energy storage; improvements in combustion sources such as biofuels and waste-to-energy; and mitigation through carbon-capture and sequestration.

• Reducing carbon output will threaten entrenched economic interests and disrupt longstanding communities built around hydrocarbon industries.

• Ocean energy, renewable synthetic fuels, next-generation nuclear power, methane hydrates, wireless energy transmission, and energy harvesting are promising but far from maturity. Industrialized biotechnology can contribute to the manufacturing and extraction sectors, food and health security, and defense.

Many new technologies hold great potential for addressing the complex challenges the world faces, but their impact will be blunted if available to only a few countries or elite segments of populations. Increased global connectivity makes populations more aware of new technologies and more eager to access them. Countries and regional and international organizations could be hamstrung by the differing rates at which national and international policies develop relative to those of technology developments.

173

• Technological advances in healthcare, synthetic biology and biotechnology, information, materials and manufacturing, and robotics are likely to improve disease prevention, surveillance, treatment, and management that will improve quality of life and lengthen lifespans.

• Automation could reduce pharmaceutical R&D costs by enabling computerized rational drug design and human-system modeling that reduce animal testing and failed products.

Advanced biotechnology alone cannot address a number of important public health threats, such as the rise of antimicrobial resistance (AMR). There is also a pressing need for relatively simple technologies that can be made affordable for a global population. To meet these needs, business practices in generating new health technologies are likely to shift. Pandemic and AMR research has already shifted toward public funds rather than private investment for product development; development funds are also likely to come from nontraditional sources, including other high-income countries, emerging economies, and philanthropic sources. In short, changes in innovation models will be as important as changes in the technologies themselves.

How much will individuals, governments, and private, civil, and international organizations partner in new ways to build resilience into critical human support systems? Making support providers more resilient will be critical to reducing the impact of climate-change related events—particularly in densely populated urban areas—and to improving the speed and quality of responses to those events. Many states and local governments will be unable to provide the capital needed for major infrastructure investments, making support from sources such as civil and international organizations, corporations, and individuals necessary for success. However, motivating donors and political interests—which may see little incentive to develop more-resilient, redundant infrastructure, rather than just more infrastructure—may prove difficult. An additional challenge will be to work with individuals, organizations such as researchers, NGOs, and corporations, states, and the international community to make technologies and capabilities available to both “haves” and “have nots.” “

Rockefeller to the rescue?  Or just more profiteering masked as philanthropy?

“Resilient cities” Rockefeller programming Agenda 2030 style.

http://www.100resilientcities.org

Don’t tell me you still think Rockefeller’s one of the good guys?!  In this case, here’s James Corbett to burst that bubble.

https://www.corbettreport.com/bigoil/

bigoilsidebar

The world on trial: will Globalism/Socialism win?

Exactly as I see it, only written much better than I could do! Thank you Jon.

Please read on, folks, and take off those rose-colored glasses

.

“Before he was killed in the shoot-down of Korean Airlines Flight 007 (1983), Congressman Larry McDonald stated: “The drive of the Rockefellers and their allies is to create a one-world government combining supercapitalism and Communism under the same tent, all under their control… Do I mean conspiracy? Yes, I do. I am convinced there is such a plot, international in scope, generations old in planning, and incredibly evil in intent.””

Jon Rappoport's Blog

The world on trial: will Socialism/Globalism win?

By Jon Rappoport

These words—Socialism and Globalism—are a mystery to most people. What do they mean? Why do they matter?

They matter because, behind the mask, they indicate massive centralized power at the top of the food chain. They aren’t “movements on behalf of the people.” They aren’t “humanitarian solutions to our problems.”

The massive power I refer to consists of governments, mega-corporations, banks, foundations, and technocrats working together, colluding, cooperating, planning a future of control over the world population.

Before he was killed in the shoot-down of Korean Airlines Flight 007 (1983), Congressman Larry McDonald stated: “The drive of the Rockefellers and their allies is to create a one-world government combining supercapitalism and Communism under the same tent, all under their control… Do I mean conspiracy? Yes, I do. I am convinced there is such a plot, international in scope, generations old…

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