Maine Sets the Example

This is a repost from my favorite farmer: Joel Salatin
Blog: Musings From the Lunatic Farmer

I would also have been speechless at the response to his question at that California conference!


I’d love to hear what y’all think, too. 🙂

Second Amendment for Food

            A ballot initiative you may not have heard about in Maine late Tuesday created unprecedented freedom for voluntary food commerce.  This first-of-its kind constitutional amendment does what the U.S. Bill of Rights failed to do:  guarantee citizens the right to choose their food.

  The measure added language to the state constitution providing that individuals have a natural, inherent, and unalienable right to food, including the right to save and exchange seeds and the right to grow, raise, harvest, produce, and consume the food of their own choosing for their own nourishment, sustenance, bodily health, and well-being, as long as an individual does not commit trespassing, theft, poaching, or other abuses of private property rights, public lands, or natural resources in the harvesting, production, or acquisition of food.”

        What this does is give the individual legal standing to sue any entity–including a government entity–that stands in their way of acquiring the food of their choice from the source of their choice.  This language has been championed by the Farm to Consumer Legal Defense Fund for years and it’s truly wonderful to see that a state has finally adopted it into its constitution.

             Both the Farm Bureau Federation (you know, that outfit that says it’s a friend of farmers?) and the Maine Dairy lobby fought aggressively against it, charging that it would undermine food safety.  That’s always the argument, that choice is too risky.  Somebody might get bad milk, rotten chicken, or spoiled porridge.  Yes, that’s possible, but it’s also possible they’ll be able to get better milk, better chicken, and better porridge than heretofore available due to burdensome government regulations.

             I’m thrilled over this development and anticipate Maine now leading the nation in local food commerce.  It’ll be interesting to see if the federal government attacks the state like it did with the Food Sovereignty Act several years ago.  At that time, the federal government said that if the state didn’t rescind that freedom, it would pull all inspection from the state and nothing would be able to move outside state lines.  Maine buckled.

             Let’s hope Maine holds firm this time around because the same opposition is still very much in power, both at the industry level and the bureaucratic level.  Lest you think this is all academic, let me relate a quick story.  Several years ago I was speaking at a college in California and had about 300 people in a lecture hall.  I asked them “how many of you think that a government food safety official should inspect carrots and beets harvested from your own garden before you can eat them?”   One-third of the hands went up.  I’ll never forget the moment.  I literally was speechless (that’s a big deal for me) for a bit, trying to metabolize this reality.

             Are you in agreement with what Maine just did, or do you think this will fill the hospitals with folks suffering from tainted food?

~Joel Salatin

All’s Well That Ends Well

An early frost again this year means no pumpkins for us.

So close, and yet so far

Most folks think it’s climate change, others claim it’s the Grand Solar Minimum. I suggest it’s something else completely—chemical ice nucleation for weather modification. I don’t think mother nature swings quite like that without the hands of man involved. I suppose only time will tell.

I will today, however, stay focused on the nice and easy, if only to prove I can manage to do such a thing whenever I choose.

So, here’s a fun family walk.

And a huge harvest of sweet potatoes, along with some ginger and tumeric, too.

And a sweet little harvest of honey and wax.

Resourceful bees happily cleaning up my mess
Prepared for the next crops, garlic and onions, coming soon.
The final scent of summer—the last bloom of Macy’s Pride

And to end, a tender and thoughtful bow to a dear man we’ve lost today, sparing him, and our extended family, of potentially many painful years coping with a debilitating disease. A merciful passing for which we are grateful.

Papi, now completely blind and mostly deaf, is also not far from
his final journey to the great beyond.

May he rest in peace.

“My Government Lied To Me…” — Freedom Through Empowerment

Texas Father Who Lost 16-Year-Old Son to the Pfizer Vaccine “My government lied to me” pic.twitter.com/g6LTowkZeW — Chief Nerd (@TheChiefNerd) November 3, 2021 Please take 2 minutes to watch this heartbreaking video of Mr. Ernest Ramirez talking about the death of his son from the Pfizer vaccine. We owe it to him and all those […]

“My Government Lied To Me…” — Freedom Through Empowerment

The Largest Land Grab in History — Piece of Mindful

The strategies and tactics directing human health systems and forest health management exhibit striking similarities.  Religious believers in the “active forest management” cult have declared that we need more vegetation manipulation — prescribed burning, logging, and thinning — to control large blazes.  Cultist ignore the numerous examples around the American West where burning/thinning/logging did nothing […]

The Largest Land Grab in History — Piece of Mindful

Mighty Mirliton

This post is just a quick plant profile because I’m so very pleased we’ve finely been successful growing this impressive and delicious squash. We’ve tried at least five times previously and they never lived through the summer and died long before producing fruit in early fall. I wish I knew how we got lucky this time!

Sechium edule, aka mirliton, crook, vegetable pear, pimpinella, chayote, christophine, chocho

A perennial with leaves, fruit and root all edible. One plant can easily produce 100 fruits a year. It’s a day-length sensitive plant grown in tropical and subtropical areas.

In Zone 8 it can come back from the roots if well-mulched. Fingers crossed here! It was first domesticated in southern Mexico and Central America. The fruits are used raw like a zucchini or cucumber, or cooked like potatoes.

It’s a very popular vegetable in Creole cooking. It’s used in fritters, stuffed, pickled and smothered.

We’ll be trying all of those!

Sources:
Perennial Vegetables by Eric Toensmeier
Louisiana Real & Rustic by Emeril Lagasse

FOOD FRAUD: ‘Built To Break’, Exposing The Sinister Rockefeller Food System Agenda — RIELPOLITIK

Source – journal-neo.org “…The most damaging components of American agriculture since the 1990s has been the wholesale introduction of GMO crops—especially soybeans, corn and cotton and the highly carcinogenic Monsanto-Bayer Roundup with glyphosate. The Rockefeller report omits their direct role in fostering that devastation by their creating and promoting Monsanto and GMO for decades, knowing […]

FOOD FRAUD: ‘Built To Break’, Exposing The Sinister Rockefeller Food System Agenda — RIELPOLITIK

Co-Creating Abundance

No politics or unpleasant ponderings this post, I promise!

Just some homesteady happy snaps and a well wishing for a wonderful weekend. 🙂

A sea of sweet potatoes soon to be harvested.

Mexican tarragon—an attractive replacement for French tarragon that does much better in the South.

Drum roll, please, for this next rare shot . . .
A Skittles sighting!

Our barn cat, Skittles, who we see about once a week and lives mostly in the trees.

Mystifying mushrooms! These are quite common, honies (armillaria tabescens) claimed to be good by a good many foragers, but we haven’t tried them yet, because my mushrooming buddy and her husband got wretchedly ill on them once.
Oops, I promised no unpleasantries. 😉

Buttercup paying homage to the pack leader, Tori, she does this multiple times a day.

I suppose these next snaps might be unpleasant to some, sorry! I do get that, I felt that at first too, but I was gradually desensitized as I realized how much economic sense it makes, what an amazing skill it is, and especially how magically delicious it is.

Always an attentive audience at slaughter time.

Our favorite foraging expert who we forayed with nearby this past spring has a great new website all about medicinals. Here’s a short podcast about it, and reminding me that now is the time I should be collecting some goldenrod before winter! Medicine Man Plant Co

Healing properties of medicinal plants

New Thoughts on Old Age

We’ve been at this about a decade now, learning by trial and error. Because of a major health crisis in the family, I’ve been introspecting even more than usual these days. That’s why I haven’t been posting much lately.

I thought it high time to deeply consider what our own health futures might hold, Hubby and I, while we are not under the immediate duress of old age and poor health. Health is one of the main reasons why we committed to this homesteading lifestyle. Other reasons are political, esthetic, quality of life and, for me at least, a sense of urgency to hold on to something precious for future generations—nature—before it slips completely from our lives.

Tumeric flowering, didn’t know they do that!

Watching the impact of the Scamdemic not only on the economy, but also on our ‘health care’ system has demonstrated unequivocally that, despite the challenges and hardships, we’ve made the right choice.

Our ‘health care’ system, which is actually a disease promoting system, is beyond hope, in my estimation. (This one’s surely gone viral by now, but in case you haven’t seen it yet, it’s brilliant!)
The DEVOLUTION of covid vaccine efficacy

I truly believe the only way out of the mess this country has become is by reclaiming our natural rights back from the government.

However, that first means reclaiming our natural responsibilities—those ‘unpleasant’ aspects of life we’ve come to outsource to the government (and their corporate partners in crime) in the first place, which has made it ridiculously powerful, as all governments (and their co-conspirators) are wont to be.

We are trying to accomplish that by first demonstrating to ourselves, and then hopefully to others, that such a thing is possible, and also desirable.

But what if, due to our increasing age, we had to choose?
Limited strength, mobility issues, cognitive decline, all are serious potential threats to our continued lifestyle here.

Considering this I’ve made a few lists, ranking our current activities against future realities based on: Required inputs, health impact, pleasure principle, and bang for the buck.

It isn’t pleasant. I don’t want to give up any of it, ever! Bees, chickens, pigs, sheep, goats, veggie garden, fruit orchard . . . .
But, here goes.

  1. Kombucha, no caveats, it stands alone. If you can make tea you can make kombucha. It’s healthy, it’s fun, it’s delicious. Hubby no longer drinks beer or soda thanks to this amazing beverage, better for health and finances for us, and far better for the environment too, with almost no waste.
  2. Sourdough bread, and already we have caveats. I know loads of folks think they are gluten intolerant; I used to think I was too. Grains properly prepared are nothing like most store-bought breads, for health and taste. Around these parts you can’t even find good bread. In other locales you may be able to find it, but I’d guess the prices are scary. Making your own sourdough bread is time consuming, but it’s not difficult. Same goes for sourdough cookies, brownies, pizza crusts, etc. And, let’s face it, gluten-free products are not tasty, so there’s some extra incentive.
  3. Raised garden beds, and more caveats. Starting to garden at an advanced age is probably not going to be too successful. Of all we do here it claims the prize of Most: most expensive, most labor intensive, most greatest learning curve, most unreliable results. Still, I love it! So, continuing to garden with some foresight and adjustments is perfectly doable. I insist!

That short list makes me sad. It’s the bare bones and I hope such sacrifices will never be required of us—no more chickens, goats, big dogs, great big garden?!

I don’t even want to consider it, but there it is.

Tori surveying the gopher damage. Bad rodents!

There are also many projects still on my list to successfully accomplish, which are in trial and error mode now. Like making all our own body care and household cleaning products and herbal medicines. Hubby has future hopes of making furniture, if his current to-do list will ever allow it. No time for poor health here!

So, another short list is in order. The three things, in addition to those above, that I hope and pray we never get too old for:
1. Bees — not even for the honey necessarily
2. Chickens — they are easy enough to manage, but they attract predators
3. Goats — mostly for the cheese making, but they’re pretty good company too

And the three things we would most likely not be able to continue into old age:
1. Slaughtering — tough work, no doubt about it
2. Orchard — even established ones are a lot of work
3. Pigs — high maintenance, yes, but so delicious

We have no intention of ever rejoining urban life. And as far as intentions go, avoiding nursing homes and hospitals is right at the top of that list as well.

Thanks, Decker https://dispatchesfromtheasylum.com/ for sharing this good one!

I’d love to read any comments on how you’ll be avoiding the hospitals and nursing homes too! And, are you sick of ‘civilization’ yet?!

BIG PHARMA: Beyond Industrial Medicine – By Charles Eisenstein

“The same pattern applies to what is called “mental health.” Thirteen years ago I wrote an essay, Mutiny of the Soul, which described various mental conditions like depression and anxiety as forms of rebellion against an insane world. By calling those conditions illnesses and treating them with psychiatric medications, we suppress the rebellion and adjust the individual to fit society as it is.”

RIELPOLITIK

Source – charleseisenstein.org

  • …Thirteen years ago I wrote an essay, Mutiny of the Soul, which described various mental conditions like depression and anxiety as forms of rebellion against an insane world. By calling those conditions illnesses and treating them with psychiatric medications, we suppress the rebellion and adjust the individual to fit society as it is”

Beyond Industrial Medicine

By Charles Eisenstein


Originally published on www.charleseisenstein.substack.com

Let’s say I’m addicted to prescription pain-killers. You are my concerned friend. “Charles,” you say, “you’ve really got to get off this medication. It’s ruining your health, and someday you’re likely to OD.”

“But I can’t stop taking it. I’m in pain all the time. If I don’t take it I can’t function at all. I have terrible back pain, and my doctor says there is nothing I can do about it.”

If you accept the premises of my response, you’ll have…

View original post 2,974 more words

Still Harvesting

No rest for the weary around here!  Our goal of year-round garden harvesting has been met and is every bit as rewarding, and exhausting, as I expected.

Living, working and eating according to the season is remarkably satisfying.  In the last couple of years especially I’ve spent much less time learning from books and much more on direct observing and experimenting.  

I’m thinking our next goal should be to throw the calendar and the clock out with the garbage. Show those Amish what a real Luddite looks like! HA! 🙂

This time of year the spiders tell me it’s a good thing I’ve got the cool season crops out already. Many of them were started indoors, then transferred outside under shade cloth which will remain until the heat breaks, fingers crossed we don’t get an early frost.  

I’ve just started harvesting the sweet potatoes, the luffa and peppers are going crazy, the radishes, volunteer cherry tomatoes and lettuces are finally happy again and I’m most excited for the mirliton squash (chayote) that is finally getting its first flowers.  This will (hopefully) be our first success with mirlitons following multiple failed attempts.  I love this squash, but it thrives in southern Louisiana mostly, because it needs a very long warm season, even longer than we get here.  I started these indoors in February, along with the turmeric, also a first for us this year.

Several heat lovers pictured above: turmeric, ginger, sweet potatoes, mirliton, peppers, luffa.
Below: longevity spinach

As soon as it cools down I’ll also be harvesting honey, lots of herbs for drying and pesto, along with foraged leaves and roots for teas— sassafras, beauty berry, sumac—and once we finally get some rain, it’ll be time for mushrooms.   

Hubby will be filling the freezer with lamb and pork and freshening our flock for spring lambs and a few to add to our growing herd of milking goats.

Hibiscus in May, hibiscus today . … still not blooming because I got a late start.

The honey bees love the Thai basil and the native bees especially love the salvia and the sweet potato and luffa flowers.  We’ve decided next year to plant an entire row of luffa in the orchard just for the bees and pigs.

Hope you can enjoy a moment of piglet playtime! Surely there will be time for a wee rest in late winter?

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