The Value of Venom

Honeybees know the value of their venom, they give their lives for it.  We know how precious is the value of the honeybees’ venom, understanding it as both cure and poison.

In natural healing bee venom is used for all sorts of cures, a number of them painful.  Honeybees can be merciless, even to each other, for the ‘greater good’.

What did I find today outside one of our hives but droves of drones, those are the males, kicked out by those bossy female workers who clearly decided they could no longer be supported. They will also kill and replace an unproductive queen without hesitation.

And me, being the opportunistic and cunning human that I am, collected these evicted dead bodies in order to make Podmore, considered an exceptional traditional medicine used to cure all sorts of ailments.

Quite unknown to American beekeepers, I wonder why, considering its value? Could it be they don’t like the thought or action of collecting dead bees?
Podmore

This reminds me of another big related beef I have with our current cultural climate: Weakness is not a virtue.  And neither is positivity.

I like the way Micheal Tsarion just put it in his last podcast, because I think it’s spot on. Our Prozac smile culture is in a “regressed state of animated autism.”

The Reign of the Terrible Mother

Optimistic bias undermines preparedness and invites disaster, according to sociologist Karen Cerulo.

In Barbara Ehrenreich’s 2009 book, Bright-Sided: How the Relentless Promotion of Positive Thinking Has Undermined America, she underscores how hard Americans have been working to adapt to the popular and largely unchallenged principles of the positivity movement, our reflexive capacity for dismissing disturbing news, whitewashing tragedy as a ‘failure of imagination’ and relentlessly spinning suffering as little more than a growth opportunity.

While in fact I am writing now out of a spirit of sourness and personal disappointment, unlike Ehrenreich according to her intro, I nonetheless find much value in her final paragraph: “Once our basic material needs are met—in my utopia, anyway—life becomes a perpetual celebration in which everyone has a talent to contribute.  But we cannot levitate ourselves into that blessed condition by wishing it.  We need to brace ourselves for a struggle against terrifying obstacles, both of our own making and imposed by the natural world.  And the first step is to recover from the mass delusion that is positive thinking.”

The bees know.

One of the very many things that fascinate me about the bees is that the Freemasons so covet it as a symbol.  I can imagine there are many reasons for this, most of which will probably remain a lifelong mystery to me.

At some point the bees simply refuse to adjust any more and they swarm, this is a natural, healthy, cyclical process, which most American beekeepers try to avoid at all costs.

We seem as a culture to abhor natural processes.

As cruel as this is sure to sound, could it be that maybe swarms and cullings are natural processes for humans as well as bees?

6CA978BD-9288-40E7-9397-8B4D2A444958
Moving colony from nuc to permanent hive.  How you like my fancy paint job? 🙂
7D32A3B8-7388-4DC9-BF42-148ACC828FB5
Setting up a swarm trap. Open invitation to immigrants, move-in ready!

My new honeybee hero and virtual mentor: Dr. Leo Sharashkin!

 

Weeping Mary: A Tale of Deceit

The most famous place in East Texas to be demolished in the spring of weather chaos in our region is Caddo Mounds, also known as the George C. Davis site, a state historic site, at the intersection of Texas Highway 21 and U.S Route 69.  Said to be Native American burial, ceremonial and residential mounds of the Caddoean Mississippi culture, it is a major archaeological discovery with what was once a popular museum and ‘living history’ gathering place for community and well beyond.

The date was 4/13/2019 during a Caddo cultural festival in the middle of the afternoon.  There was one death and many injured taken to hospital by helicopter and bus.

https://www.cbs19.tv/article/news/storm-hits-caddo-mounds-during-caddo-culture-day-festival/501-26e14ff5-32ac-486d-bcc9-cb5de81cc2a5

The location is not Alto, as all sources report, it is Weeping Mary, population fewer than 50 people.  The original story of the town’s founding is one of deceit, hardly uncommon, and I expect at play in this more recent sad story somewhere as well.

It goes the town was founded by freedmen after the Civil War.  It ended up in the hands of a former slave named Mary, who needed to sell but did not want to sell to a white man.  So the white man hired a black man to buy it for him, and when Mary discovered this she was left eternally weeping.

E5BD3548-8A76-481B-AB25-452B1D7C0F0C

Scenes And Sorrows: A Portrait Of Weeping Mary

WEEPING MARY, TX | The Handbook of Texas Online| Texas State Historical Association (TSHA)

“Estimated cost to rebuild Caddo Mounds State Historic site $2.5 million”