#ExposeBillGates

Better late than never! Proud to be jumping on this bandwagon, as it’s SO getting HUGE!  https://www.corbettreport.com/why-we-must-exposebillgates/

From James Corbett’s Latest Article:

Welcome. If you’re reading these words, then it’s likely that you’re here because of the #ExposeBillGates global day of action.

Perhaps you’re here out of curiosity. Perhaps you came here to argue with crazy conspiracy theorists. Perhaps you already know about the #ExposeBillGates movement but just want to learn more.

Whatever your motivations for clicking on this link, I promise you this article is not clickbait. This is not a put-on or satire or a trendy internet listicle. The #ExposeBillGates movement is deadly serious, and it aims to alert the public to the real dangers of the world that are coming into view: a world of lockdowns and quarantines, masks and vaccines, checkpoints and immunity passports, cashless payments and biometric IDs.

So the first question you might be asking is: why Bill Gates? Why are all these people on the internet trying to warn about Bill Gates in the midst of this global pandemic? Isn’t Gates a philanthropist who’s trying to help the world out by donating his fortune to good causes?

It was to answer that very question that I created my feature-length documentary on this subject, Who Is Bill Gates?

Bill Gates is not a selfless philanthropist

When he set up the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation with his wife and his father around the turn of the 21st century, Bill Gates went from villain to superhero in the public imagination seemingly overnight. No longer a reviled monopolist who built his Microsoft empire on the back of glitchy software and out of a ruthless desire to squash his competition, Gates was suddenly seen as a selfless philanthropist, generously giving away his fortune for the benefit of the world.

What few realize is that Gates’ philanthropy is hardly selfless. He “generously” donates to causes that directly benefit his family (like his $80 million gift to the prestigious private school that his own children attend) and his business interests. His foundation has even provided hundreds of millions of dollars in grants to corporations like Merck, Novartis, GlaxoSmithKline, Vodafone, Sanofi, Ericsson, LG, Medtronic, and Teva in which his foundation trust holds corporate stocks and bonds.

This self-serving “giving” might account for the striking fact that, over the past decade of his “philanthropy,” Gates’ net worth has actually doubled, from $50 billion to over $100 billion.

Suggested further reading: Bill Gates’s Charity Paradox

The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation has monopolized the global health industry

Gates’ unique brand of philanthropy doesn’t simply benefit his family financially. It also affords him unprecedented power in the field of global public health, where his foundation directs much of its funds. It is remarkable that the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation is the second-largest donor to the World Health Organization (WHO), right behind the US government. In fact, if the US government does withdraw its funding from the WHO next year as it is currently threatening to do, the Gates Foundation will be the single largest funding source for the group.

But Gates’ influence extends far beyond the WHO. The Gates Foundation co-founded the Global Fund to Fight AIDS; the Global Financing Facility for Women, Children and Adolescents; the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations; Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance; the Stop TB Partnership; and seemingly every other major global health initiative of the past two decades.

To many, the fact that Gates’ funding is behind all of these initiatives is just another sign that Gates is serious in his pledge to devote his wealth to charitable causes. But a growing number of people around the world see the outsized influence of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation as a cause for concern. By funding individual health initiatives and entire organizations into existence, Gates has garnered the ability to direct research priorities and even to determine what forms of medical intervention are used to treat various diseases.

As the WHO’s own malaria chief, Dr. Arata Kochi, warned in an internal memo, Gates’ influence means that the world’s leading malaria scientists are now “locked up in a ‘cartel’ with their own research funding being linked to those of others within the group” and that the foundation is “stifling debate on the best ways to treat and combat malaria, prioritizing only those methods that relied on new technology or developing new drugs.”

Suggested further reading: Bill Gates’ Web Of Dark Money And Influence – Part 1: Philanthropic Narrative Shaping

The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation has been involved in illegal and unethical research in developing countries

The Gates Foundation has been involved in a number of scandals involving illegal and unethical medical research and clinical trials of vaccines and drugs throughout the developing world.

In 2006, for example, Gates funds were used to help PATH—a global health nonprofit based in Gates’ hometown of Seattle—embark on a five-year project “to generate and disseminate evidence for informed public sector introduction of HPV vaccines.” In India, this project involved a “demonstration project” for GlaxoSmithKline’s and Merck’s HPV vaccines. The aim was to get those vaccines included on India’s national immunization schedule. The Hindunoted that this “shockingly unethical trial” involved flagrant breaches of basic ethical guidelines, including 2,800 cases of children being enrolled in the program by wardens or headmasters acting as “guardian.” The Indian parliament itself wrote a blistering reportexcoriating the parties involved for their violation of the human rights of the study’s participants.

Other shocking examples of Gates participation or funding in questionable or outright unethical trials include:

  • The Gates-founded and funded Meningitis Vaccine Project, which led to the creation and testing of MenAfriVac, a $0.50-per-dose immunization against meningococcal meningitis. The tests led to reports of between 40 and 500 children suffering seizures and convulsions and eventually becoming paralyzed.
  • The 2017 confirmation that the Gates-supported oral polio vaccine was actually responsible for the majority of new polio cases and the 2018 follow-up study showing that 80% of polio cases are now vaccine-derived.
  • The 2018 paper in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, which concluded that over 490,000 people in India developed paralysis as a result of being given the oral polio vaccine between 2000 and 2017.

Suggested further reading: Accountability of International NGOs: Human Rights Violations in Healthcare Provision in Developing Countries and the Effectiveness of Current Measures

The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation has practiced philanthropic racism throughout the developing world

Critics of the Gates Foundation have noted that its efforts to limit population growth (including Melinda Gates’ promotion of the highly controversial Depo Provera drug and other forms of injectable birth control) have centered primarily on nations in Africa and Latin America. The charge that focusing population control programs on these countries constitutes “philanthropic racism” is bolstered by the specter of eugenics. Indeed, the eugenics philosophy has hung like a dark cloud over the realm of corporate foundation philanthropy ever since these philanthropic vehicles were pioneered by the Rockefeller Foundation, the Carnegie Foundation and similar organizations at the turn of the 20th century.

Eugenics is a pseudoscientific rationale for racism and classism that was massively popular in the United States during the Progressive Era of the early 1900s. It holds that the rich and powerful are fit, by virtue of their superior genes, to rule over the “infirm” and “feebleminded” and those with “defective germplasm”—terms that were used to refer to the handicapped, the poor, ethnic minorities and common criminals.

As a field of study, eugenics was largely funded by the philanthropic foundations that the late-19th-century robber barons had founded as a tax-free shelter for their enormous wealth. The Rockefeller Foundation and the Carnegie Foundation in particular helped with significant cash infusions into the Eugenics Records Office and other key research facilities in the eugenic movement. This research led to the passage of involuntary sterilization laws across the US and even the T4 eugenic sterilization program in Nazi Germany.

After the name of eugenics was tarnished in the wake of World War II, many of the eugenics researchers continued their work under different names. Thus, many members of the American Eugenics Society took up work in the offices of John D. Rockefeller III’s Population Council, and Margaret Sanger’s Birth Control League—which had boasted prominent members of the American Eugenics Society on its board—morphed into Planned Parenthood, which was led for many years by a director of the American Eugenics Society, Alan Guttmacher. Bill Gates, Sr. also served on the board of Planned Parenthood, a fact that Gates cited as being influential in his early years as a population control advocate.

The shadow of eugenics and racism still hangs over the field of “population control” research, a stigma that the Gates Foundation has openly wrestled with in recent years.

Suggested viewing: Exposing the Gates Agenda in Africa

Gates is helping to form a cashless payment and biometric identity grid

By now, the general public is used to seeing Gates as the public face of the coronavirus crisis. Mainstream media outlets have turned time and again to Gates for more information on the response to COVID-19 and the pressing need to vaccinate “basically the entire world” against SARS-Cov-2.

But, while Gates’ role in funding the global health field is by now well known, his role in funding other technologies that will shape the post-COVID world is not.

The Gates Foundation is tied to ID2020 through Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance. Also known as the “Digital Identity Alliance,” ID2020 brings Gavi and Gates’ old company Microsoft and other corporate partners together to create a global digital ID system. This has led the Gates-tied Gavi alliance to focus increasingly on tying vaccine recipients with governmental digital health records and, ultimately, with biometric ID databases. Meanwhile, Gates himself has been a vocal advocate of India’s Aadhaar system, the ambitious project to enroll a billion Indian citizens in the largest biometric database ever constructed.

Gates is also interested in advancing the digitization of the economy. For example, he has addressed government fora in both India and the US about the benefits of digital payment systems. Also, the Gates Foundation helped co-found the Better Than Cash Alliance, a consortium of governmental and non-governmental organizations whose members are committed to creating a digital payment infrastructure for development programs and aid for the poor. This infrastructure, Gates and his cohorts argue, will help governments and aid groups to more effectively target and manage their aid.

But while the fields of global health, biometric identification and digital payments may seem distinct, they have begun to converge as governments and intergovernmental bodies start to imagine the “Great Reset” of the post-COVID “new normal.” Gates has argued that digital immunity certificates—combining the medical diagnostic field with the biometric identification field—will be necessary if life is to return to normal. That convergence is already reflected in the World Economic Forum-promoted “CovidPass” vision of a “health passport,” which would allow people to travel or prevent them from traveling based on their health status and proof of immunity or vaccination.

It does not take a great deal of imagination to see how such a health passport could be tied into the digital payment structure to prevent unvaccinated people from transacting in any number of situations that the authorities might frown upon. After all, Gates himself has toutedthe ability of governments to block transactions they disapprove of as a key part of the digital payments systems of the future.

Suggested further reading: Bill Gates Calls for a “Digital Certificate” to Identify Who Received COVID-19 Vaccine

This agenda does not begin and end with Bill Gates

Don’t let the hashtag in #ExposeBillGates fool you. True, you have seen in this article (and you will see when you watch the complete Who Is Bill Gates? documentary) that Bill Gates has played an integral role in almost every facet of the coronavirus pandemic and, more importantly, in the global response to it. But the point of #ExposeBillGates is not simply to stop one man, Bill Gates, from enacting this agenda and then to call it a day.

No, Bill Gates is merely the recognizable spider at the center of a web of organizations, institutions, corporations and government bodies that are acting in concert to transform the world as we know it. But these various bodies are all dedicated to the same vision of The Great Reset and the new normal that Bill Gates is, and they would continue to bring that vision about even if Bill Gates himself were somehow stopped.

There are many reasons to be concerned about this agenda and its implications. But even if we were to trust that Gates himself actually is a selfless philanthropist with the purest of intentions, no one should trust that the heads of the various groups, organizations, bodies, NGOs, foundations and governments who are spearheading this agenda are all similarly trustworthy. The amount of power that is being centralized in the hands of unaccountable institutions and nongovernmental bodies should be disturbing to anyone who understands the real danger of putting so much power in so few hands.

It is for this reason that people around the world are joining the #ExposeBillGates movement. They are seeking to draw attention to these issues, to work hand-in-hand with one another, and to begin a public discussion that will derail the agenda promoted by Gates and his fellow travelers.

If you share these concerns, please continue to research the information presented under the #ExposeBillGates hashtag and help spread this vital information far and wide. Together, we can make a difference.

Fact, Fiction, Fantasy

The only social media I follow are YouTube (which I’m happy to replace with D-Tube or whatever-comes-next-Tube) and this site where I post this blog.  That’s simply because, I’m not forced to spend time on any others. 

I don’t like it enough to spend many hours daily in cyberspace, but I know loads of folks are all over many social sites.  So, I rely on a few trusted channels to inform me on what’s informing our shared reality.

James Corbett is a major one, for a very long time. It’s been so long now that I’ve lost track of how many years I’ve been following his work.  James and I have a lot in common actually.  We both studied literature at university.  We both taught English in countries outside our own.  And where I’m something of a ‘word NAZI’ he’s something of a ‘fact NAZI’—something I adore about him.  (Do I even dare to make NAZI jokes these days?!)

Anyway, it’s clear in these ‘days of our virus’ (aka ‘Best Apocalypse Ever’) that facts have run amok, manufactured chaos has crowned himself king, and discernment is on death’s doorstep.

I can hear poor discernment knocking on this door, pounding actually and yelling at the top of his lungs, “Hey, anybody in there who wants to come out yet?”  He’s just found some extra room in his balloon and he’s rescuing yet-undead prisoners by the dozens.  

I expect that it’s a limited time only offer.

If you’re ready to join him, here’s a great lesson on facts.

James sparked a profound memory for me during this video: The first time I remember Mom saying to me: “Look it up!”

She was talking about the phone book, which from the moment when I pulled one of the enormous yellow volumes from the hall closet, it felt like the most fascinating book I’d ever seen.  I remember trying to figure out the phone book not long before I tried to figure out the dictionary, then the encyclopedia, then the Bible.

I remember my huge frustration at wanting to look up so many things, but I didn’t even know the words for them.  So, ‘look it up’ became my first seemingly insurmountable challenge as a child.  If I wanted to ‘look it up’ I had to first know what it’s called.

Lifetime mission begins.

Here’s going to be a great lesson on fiction.

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I’ll admit, I haven’t read it yet.  But, I’m about to start it today.  Since we’re on a James theme I figure, why not advertise it, just because I trust it’s going to be excellent?!

And here’s my life: a great lesson on making your fantasies into actual realities.  We did this, from scratch—raw land at first—mistaking our way to this point like the one-eyed man leading the blind lady.  

I can’t help but wonder sometimes if I would’ve had the courage to do it if Grandpa hadn’t thrown me in lake before I knew how to swim.

While I still mostly suck at it even after a decade, at least I can trust it’s real.

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Our newest addition to the wee homestead, next I learn to milk!

 

 

 

 

Getting Real

I’m going to spend the next few posts trying to burst your bubble.   I don’t do this to be mean or bossy, I just think it’s about time.  By “you”  I mean all those who are living in a fantasy-based reality at still this late hour. 

Call me one more canary in the coal mine, or even a nervous Nelly who cries, “The sky is falling!”  But seriously, the sky is falling. 

I’m concerned that if you don’t see it now, and start preparing, it will be too late.  You see, I believe the sky is falling, because that’s what the string-pullers are telling us, quite directly and in plain sight. 

Maybe you don’t know who I mean by ‘string-pullers’?  That doesn’t matter now anyway.  What’s crucial is you read and learn from the same materials as our U.S. president, his staff, a good number of smart executives, the majority of the world’s intelligence agents and a select number of savvy entrepreneurs. 

If you really want to know where in the world we are headed, don’t think your favorite news anchor will be telling you on TV. 

The Paradox of Progress is the latest work of the National Intelligence Council.  From wiki:

“One of the NICs most important analytical projects is a Global Trends report produced for the incoming US president. The report is delivered to the incoming president between Election Day and Inauguration Day, and it assesses critical drivers and scenarios for global trends with an approximate time horizon of fifteen years. The Global Trends analysis provides a basis for long-range strategic policy assessment for the White House and the intelligence community. The NIC’s most recent Global Trends report, “Global Trends 2035: Paradox of Progress” was released in January 2017.[1]

These are the folks who know which strings are being pulled.  That’s their job.  I don’t think they just make this stuff up for fun; I think they are quite serious about their work, and a wise man or woman should know where that work is taking us.

From page 170:

“Natural and human-induced changes in many of Earth’s ecosystems during the coming decades are likely to weaken the planet’s resilience and expose humans to new health, food, water, energy, and infrastructure vulnerabilities and demands. With changes in climate, weather will become less predictable and suitable for the status quo. The oceans’ biodiversity will plummet as they become warmer and more acidic, fragile, and polluted. Human and animal health will face threats from heatwaves, cold snaps, and the altered dynamics of pathogen spread. These risks will be distributed unequally in time and geography but have the potential to harm most of the world’s populations and ecosystems—severely in some cases, and catastrophically in others.

Environmental and climate changes will challenge systems in different dimensions; heat waves, for example, stress infrastructure, energy, human and animal health, and agriculture. Climate change— observed or anticipated—almost certainly will become an increasingly integral component of how people view their world, especially as populations are projected to swell in those areas most vulnerable to extreme weather events and sea-level rise, including coastal megacities and regions already suffering from water scarcity. Many of the ecological and environmental stresses from climate change—and the infectious diseases it will affect—will cut across state borders, making coordination among governments and international institutions crucial to effective responses. Policies and programs to mitigate and adapt to these challenges will spur opportunities for those well-positioned to benefit.

Major Trends Changes in Earth Systems. Climate change, sea level rise, and ocean acidification are likely to amplify stresses already felt from population growth, urbanization, inadequate environmental protection, and the use of energy and past natural resources. Although new climate policies could reduce the rate of greenhouse gas emissions over time, past emissions already have locked in a significant rise in global mean temperature, which will in turn drive more frequent and intense extreme weather events, such as heatwaves, droughts, and floods. The steady run of record-setting weather and growing frequency of extreme events suggest to many scientists that climate change is hitting harder and sooner than the gradual change often projected. The intensity of the disruptions could vary widely, spawning unpleasant surprises, particularly given that an increasingly significant fraction of the planet’s species already are at increased extinction risk.

Forecasting changes with greater regional and time precision becomes increasingly uncertain, but the stresses will probably disrupt the most vulnerable—or unlucky—populations in countries at all levels of development.

Storm surges, augmented by sea level rise, are likely to threaten many coastal systems and lowlying areas, and this environmental volatility almost certainly will disrupt food production patterns and water availability, fueling broader economic, political and social stresses. Changes in the Arctic will exceed those felt in the middle latitudes, and reductions in summer sea-ice will make the Arctic more accessible than any time in human history.

Human and Animal Health Under Pressure. Changing environmental conditions and increasing global connectivity will affect precipitation patterns, biodiversity, and the geographic distribution of pathogens and their hosts, which will in turn affect the viability and vitality of crops and agricultural systems; the emergence, transmission, and spread of human and animal infectious diseases; and potential medical and pharmacological discoveries. The direct impact by environmental stressors to human health from increased heat stress, floods, drought, and increased frequency of intense storms will force difficult decisions on how and where to live, particularly in low-income countries in sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia.

Indirect environmental threats to population health will emerge in the form of food insecurity, under-nutrition, and air and water quality declines as a result of pollution. Troubling trends in communicable diseases—in particular, emerging zoonotic diseases, antimicrobial resistant (AMR) pathogens—and noncommunicable diseases (NCDs)—including heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and mental illness—may be the result of these effects,

These concerns will be further intensified by demographic and cultural trends, such as aging societies in Europe and Asia; inadequate nutrition and sanitation in Africa and India, urbanization and development in uninhabited areas and the rise of megacities; and a widening inequality gap. Perversely, increased longevity—an almost-universal goal—will reduce food and water security in places that are only marginally capable of supporting their populations.

Unaddressed disease-control deficiencies in national and global health systems will make outbreaks more difficult to detect and manage, increasing the potential for epidemics far beyond their points of origin. Increasing contact between people and the easier spread of diseases mean that chronic infectious diseases that are already widespread—such as tuberculosis, HIV/AIDS, and hepatitis—will continue to pose heavy economic and human burdens on high-prevalence countries, despite the significant international resources that have been committed to combatting them. Many middleincome countries already struggle with the burden of increasing noncommunicable diseases on top of persistent infectious diseases.

Critical Human Systems at Risk. The increasing incidence of extreme weather events put all people at risk, although those concentrated in dense areas will be especially vulnerable. International organizations will be increasingly stretched to respond to the food, water, transportation, shelter, and health needs of those affected unless states and localities have made provisions to mitigate the risks, such as infrastructure improvements and early warning systems.

Soil and land degradation during the next 20 years will diminish land available for food production, contributing to shortages and raising prices. Even more-affluent nations are at risk, to the extent that they rely on the highly efficient global agricultural trade that has developed under stable environmental conditions during peacetime.

Water shortages and pollution probably will undermine the economic performance and health conditions of populations worldwide, including those of major developing countries. Economic output would suffer if countries do not have enough clean water to generate electrical power or to support manufacturing and resource extraction. Water problems—added to poverty, social tension, environmental degradation, ineffectual leadership, gender inequality, and weak political institutions—contribute to social disruptions that can prompt state failures.

Key Choices How will political leaders and populations respond to a world less able to sustain life? Environmental and ecological degradation and climate change are likely to force governments and aid organizations at all levels to wrestle with how to divide their resources between crisis response—especially to the most vulnerable populations—and long-term investment to build more resilient and adaptive systems. Unprecedented weather events and ongoing desertification will hurt vulnerable populations in Africa, Asia, and the Middle East, with major droughts probably causing some water, food, and livestock systems to fail. More intense tropical storms will have a cumulative impact on infrastructure, health, and biodiversity in some coastal and low-lying areas that could overwhelm recovery and reconstruction efforts. Those struggling to survive such disruptions could, on the positive side, develop radical innovations for improvement or , more negatively, turn violent, migrate—if allowed by similarly struggling or less hospitable neighbors—or die.

Some prominent voices will call for interventions involving climate geoengineering, although the governance and legal structures needed for these technologies to be deployed with minimal social disruption are almost certain to lag research and development.

There are also likely to be calls to give the victims of extreme levels of environmental degradation some form of “asylum-like” right as refugees.

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To what extent will individuals, governments, and private, civil, and international organizations employ new technologies to improve food, water, and energy security; air and ocean quality and biodiversity; human and animal health; and the resilience of transportation, information systems, and other critical infrastructure? The inability to predict the timing or location of complex environmental and climatological events increases the need to develop information systems that would better enable officials to make near realtime assessment and policy decisions to minimize damages and casualties. Prevention is better than cure; the cost of building resilient infrastructure is generally much lower than disaster recovery, but mobilizing the political will and resources to take preventative action will be difficult without a dramatic crisis to realign priorities.

Even after a crisis, the will to prevent future harm is often overwhelmed by the breadth and complexity of investing in climate and public health research, monitoring and surveillance; financing climate resilient health systems; developing a sustainable carbon budget; developing more energy-efficient buildings and transportation systems, applying “best practices” for industrial processes to reduce the risks to food, water, and health systems; improving water management through pricing allocations and “virtual water” trade; and investing in water-related sectors such as agriculture, power, and water treatment.

An increasingly important challenge for resource sustainability will be developing the capability to assess local population needs for power, fuel, and food in near real-time. Tracking the interactions between natural resources and people—and wildlife—would enable better understanding of resource needs, a key vulnerability in an era of increasingly scarce resources.

New investments in energy and technologies offer an important opportunity to reduce the risk of adverse climate change, although most of these will require substantial funding and years of effort to deliver benefits. These include clean-energy sources and enabling technologies, such as offshore wind energy, solar cells, distributed power generation, and energy storage; improvements in combustion sources such as biofuels and waste-to-energy; and mitigation through carbon-capture and sequestration.

Reducing carbon output will threaten entrenched economic interests and disrupt longstanding communities built around hydrocarbon industries.

Ocean energy, renewable synthetic fuels, next-generation nuclear power, methane hydrates, wireless energy transmission, and energy harvesting are promising but far from maturity. Industrialized biotechnology can contribute to the manufacturing and extraction sectors, food and health security, and defense.

Many new technologies hold great potential for addressing the complex challenges the world faces, but their impact will be blunted if available to only a few countries or elite segments of populations. Increased global connectivity makes populations more aware of new technologies and more eager to access them. Countries and regional and international organizations could be hamstrung by the differing rates at which national and international policies develop relative to those of technology developments.

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Technological advances in healthcare, synthetic biology and biotechnology, information, materials and manufacturing, and robotics are likely to improve disease prevention, surveillance, treatment, and management that will improve quality of life and lengthen lifespans.

Automation could reduce pharmaceutical R&D costs by enabling computerized rational drug design and human-system modeling that reduce animal testing and failed products.

Advanced biotechnology alone cannot address a number of important public health threats, such as the rise of antimicrobial resistance (AMR). There is also a pressing need for relatively simple technologies that can be made affordable for a global population. To meet these needs, business practices in generating new health technologies are likely to shift. Pandemic and AMR research has already shifted toward public funds rather than private investment for product development; development funds are also likely to come from nontraditional sources, including other high-income countries, emerging economies, and philanthropic sources. In short, changes in innovation models will be as important as changes in the technologies themselves.

How much will individuals, governments, and private, civil, and international organizations partner in new ways to build resilience into critical human support systems? Making support providers more resilient will be critical to reducing the impact of climate-change related events—particularly in densely populated urban areas—and to improving the speed and quality of responses to those events. Many states and local governments will be unable to provide the capital needed for major infrastructure investments, making support from sources such as civil and international organizations, corporations, and individuals necessary for success. However, motivating donors and political interests—which may see little incentive to develop more-resilient, redundant infrastructure, rather than just more infrastructure—may prove difficult. An additional challenge will be to work with individuals, organizations such as researchers, NGOs, and corporations, states, and the international community to make technologies and capabilities available to both “haves” and “have nots.” “

Rockefeller to the rescue?  Or just more profiteering masked as philanthropy?

Resilient cities” Rockefeller programming Agenda 2030 style.

http://www.100resilientcities.org

Don’t tell me you still think Rockefeller’s one of the good guys?!  In this case, here’s James Corbett to burst that bubble.

https://www.corbettreport.com/bigoil/

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Agorism, continued

I used to consider myself a Liberal, back in the days before liberal politics officially embraced the Military Industrial Complex and the eternal war machine.

Then I called myself a Libertarian, until I realized the movement had been completely co-opted by the Right and been bought by the likes of the Koch brothers.   The so-called “New Right” proved itself to be exactly the same as the old Right, not exactly the Neo-Con version of the last several decades, but harking back that of my grandfather’s generation.  No thank you!

Then I called myself an Anarchist, because it was obvious to me no good was coming from politics at all.  I stand by this still, as misunderstood as it is.  Anarchy does not mean “no rules” it means “no rulers.”

It seems very much in line to me with Agorism, but I’m still learning and am not at all afraid to change my stance once again if I discover I’ve been misled or deceived or the movement has been co-opted.  The concept of the countereconomy is particularly appealing to me, because I absolutely abhor the effects of my labor going toward such criminal endeavors as war and lining the pockets of elected criminals, banksters, and their very many minions.

“Agorists regard this counter-economy as a form of nonviolent direct action, a method of simultaneously challenging and evading state power, in the process building a free society based on the principles of unrestricted voluntary exchange. Counter-economics underscores the fact that given the volume of rules, regulations, and licenses already choking economic relations, almost everyone has already participated in the counter-economy in one way or another, perhaps quite unwittingly. By simply paying no heed to arbitrary rules that attempt to prohibit completely voluntary, mutually beneficial trade, agorists are engaged in an attempt to change society without resorting to political action, which agorism regards as capitulating to the existing power structure. Agorists believe that by becoming politically engaged, running candidates and attempting to reform governmental structures and lawmaking, libertarians fall into the trap of politics — the delusion that if we only elect the right person or pass the right law, we can attain freedom. For agorists, the processes and institutions of politics are inherently and unchangeably corrupt and coercive.”

http://www.libertarianism.org/columns/black-market-activism-samuel-edward-konkin-iii-agorism

I first learned the learned the word and the philosophy from my most-trusted news source James Corbett.  His most recent article on the topic reassures me further that not only am I aligned with the message, but that it’s happening, for real.   With his typical sardonic wit, he writes, Dear Government, Deliver Us From Freedom!

In this good news piece he highlights the booming peer-to-peer economy, community exchanges and the other fantastic efforts of like-minded folks doing all they can to get the corrupt government out of their lives and livelihoods.  He lists many examples and resources, so I hope you’ll check out the entire article.

In the end he surmises sarcastically, “Do you realize what this means? It means that the plebs are actually starting to spontaneously organize in new and innovative ways to help each other. This is a disaster! What if they stop believing that all charity on earth must be provided by the government? What if they start creating self-sufficient communities? Or collaborating without corporate middlemen? Or transacting around the world without the knowledge or oversight of our tax collectors?”

Oh I do, James, I really do realize what this means!  And thank you for your years of work and ‘leadership,’ in the way that leadership is meant to be.  You have inspired me and millions, and our numbers are multiplying by the minute.

“Freedom. Terrible, terrible freedom. What if there’s no putting a lid on it?”

Amen, Brother!

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